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Preeclampsia risk assessment (during 20-36 weeks). The price of ultrasonic examination is added

Price:
50.00 €

Preeclampsia is a potentially life-threatening condition that affects many organs during a pregnancy and is characterised by an increased maternal arterial blood pressure and the appearance of protein in the urine or, in the absence of the latter, malfunctioning of other organs. This can affect both you and your unborn baby. If the risk of preeclampsia is known in advance, it can be prevented. 

 

In most women, pregnancy takes a normal course. However, preeclampsia is a relatively common condition during pregnancy, occurring in Estonia in two pregnant women out of a hundred.   

 

Screening for preeclampsia can be performed in all three trimesters. 

  • In the 11th-13th+6 gestational week of the first trimester (within the OSCAR test)
  • In the 19th-21st+6 gestational week of the second trimester (within the anatomical screening of a foetus)
  • In the 34th-36th gestational week of the third trimester (within the foetal growth and wellbeing survey)

 

How reliable is the preeclampsia risk assessment? 

 

With the OSCAR test in the I. trimester, 76% accuracy could be reached in the identification of women in a risk group who may develop early preeclampsia before the 37th week of pregnancy. In the case of a pregnancy with twins, it is possible to identify all women who may develop early preeclampsia before the 37th week. 

During the foetal anatomical screening in the II. trimester, it is possible to identify women at risk who may develop early preeclampsia before the 37th week with 85% accuracy. 

During the ultrasonic examination of foetal growth and wellbeing in the III. semester, it is possible to identify women at risk who may develop the late-onset preeclampsia after the 37th week with 85% accuracy. 

 

Why should I assess my risk of preeclampsia? 

 

During the OSCAR test in the I. trimester, the assessment of the risk of development of early preeclampsia is best, and women at risk benefit from the preeclampsia-preventing effect of aspirin. The studies have shown that at low doses, aspirin intake prior to the 16th week of pregnancy reduces the onset of early preeclampsia in 62% of cases, which may require delivery before the 37th week of pregnancy. Therefore, it is recommended that women with elevated risk should take 150 milligrams of aspirin once a day in evenings up to the 36th week of pregnancy. The objective of the treatment of women with a high risk of preeclampsia is to prevent the development of preeclampsia or to delay its onset in a later pregnancy period if the child is mature enough to be born. 

 

During the foetal anatomical screening of the II. trimester, the risk of preeclampsia obtained during the OSCAR test may be reassessed or preeclampsia screening may be recommended for women whose preeclampsia risk was not assessed during the OSCAR test.

 

During the ultrasonic examination of foetal growth and wellbeing in the III. trimester, late preeclampsia can be assessed. This is very important as 75% of preeclampsia cases occur after the 37th week of pregnancy. This provides an opportunity to monitor women with a higher risk of preeclampsia more frequently and to detect the condition in a timely manner and prepare the child's lungs for the forthcoming birth. 

 

Preeclampsia risk assessment gives you a sense of reassurance. 

 

Most of the women who participated in the preeclampsia screening belong to a low-risk group. In the case of an increased risk, the triple-stage preeclampsia screening gives you the opportunity, if necessary, to prevent the onset of preeclampsia, or to delay it to a later period of pregnancy. A sense of reassurance really necessary for you results from the reduction of the risk of preeclampsia and by careful, research-based monitoring of you and your child's state of health. In this way the child can safely be born when s/he is ready, and you can rejoice in a healthy child. 

 

  • The risk of preeclampsia can be assessed within one day.
  • The risk of preeclampsia can also be assessed in women who are expecting twins.
  • In the 34th-36th gestational week of the third trimester (within the foetal growth and wellbeing survey).

 

 

How reliable is the preeclampsia risk assessment? 

 

With the OSCAR test in the I. trimester, 76% accuracy could be reached in the identification of women in a risk group who may develop early preeclampsia before the 37th week of pregnancy. In the case of a pregnancy with twins, it is possible to identify all women who may develop early preeclampsia before the 37th week. 

During the foetal anatomical screening in the II. trimester, it is possible to identify women at risk who may develop early preeclampsia before the 37th week with 85% accuracy. 

During the ultrasonic examination of foetal growth and wellbeing in the III. semester, it is possible to identify women at risk who may develop the late-onset preeclampsia after the 37th week with 85% accuracy. 

 

Why should I assess my risk of preeclampsia? 

 

During the OSCAR test in the I. trimester, the assessment of the risk of development of early preeclampsia is best, and women at risk benefit from the preeclampsia-preventing effect of aspirin. The studies have shown that at low doses, aspirin intake prior to the 16th week of pregnancy reduces the onset of early preeclampsia in 62% of cases, which may require delivery before the 37th week of pregnancy. Therefore, it is recommended that women with elevated risk should take 150 milligrams of aspirin once a day in evenings up to the 36th week of pregnancy. The objective of the treatment of women with a high risk of preeclampsia is to prevent the development of preeclampsia or to delay its onset in a later pregnancy period if the child is mature enough to be born. 

During the foetal anatomical screening of the II. trimester, the risk of preeclampsia obtained during the OSCAR test may be reassessed or preeclampsia screening may be recommended for women whose preeclampsia risk was not assessed during the OSCAR test.

 

During the ultrasonic examination of foetal growth and wellbeing in the III. trimester, late preeclampsia can be assessed. This is very important as 75% of preeclampsia cases occur after the 37th week of pregnancy. This provides an opportunity to monitor women with a higher risk of preeclampsia more frequently and to detect the condition in a timely manner and prepare the child's lungs for the forthcoming birth. 

 

Preeclampsia risk assessment gives you a sense of reassurance. 

 

Most of the women who participated in the preeclampsia screening belong to a low-risk group. In the case of an increased risk, the triple-stage preeclampsia screening gives you the opportunity, if necessary, to prevent the onset of preeclampsia, or to delay it to a later period of pregnancy. A sense of reassurance really necessary for you results from the reduction of the risk of preeclampsia and by careful, research-based monitoring of you and your child's state of health. In this way the child can safely be born when s/he is ready, and you can rejoice in a healthy child. 

 

  • The risk of preeclampsia can be assessed within one day.
  • The risk of preeclampsia can also be assessed in women who are expecting twins.

 

Risk calculator for preeclampsia